Working in live sound and concert recording: (2)

The Music Telegraph | Text 2019/01/28 [12:38]

Working in live sound and concert recording: (2)

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2019/01/28 [12:38]

▲ Louis P. Ciminelli Recital Hall

© The State University of New York, Buffalo



 

Working in live sound and concert recording: (2)

 

 

 

Equipment requirements:

Most live sound and concert recording gigs require an extensive amount of equipment that needs to be set up and run during a performance. This equipment can be both cumbersome and expensive. It may not always be in your best interest to contract to do gig by supplying all your own gear. On the other hand, it may be best to bring equipment that you know and trust.

Generally speaking it would be a good idea if the Promoter or Client was responsible for renting or delivering the heavy complex gear:

 

 

 

Promoter/Client should provide (rent or purchase):

(A) Large, heavy, complex and expensive items, are subject to obsolescence, or frequent re-design, and/or re-configuration. Whether out of sheer fiscal pragmatism, or for reasons of convenience, “show-by-show” rental, with fully inclusive technical support, makes good sense. Especially convenient, are: set-up/break-down features, a service plan and theft and damage insurance. It’s usually advisable to rent from reputable companies within the regions of a tour (it is quite rare and expensive to rent for national travel).

 

 

 

Engineer should provide (rent or purchase):

(B) Items whose sound (sonic properties) and/or responses, you’re familiar with, and with which you choose to define your sound, as well as enjoying the confidence and self-assurance these tools provide. Obviously some Live sound/Concert Recording companies prefer to specialize in a narrow spectrum of music, while others are comfortable generalizing. The musical genre style of any given concert or tour will dictate the specifies of your equipment and/or instruments selection.

 

 

 

Some Equipment Basics (and who should provide them):

- Multi-input recording or live sound FOH and monitor console, plus large patchbay (A)

- Near-Field monitors (2 or 4, small & medium) (B)

- Signal-processor rack modules, including: gates, aural exciter & digital F/X units (A or B)

- 1 or 2 video cameras, on tripods, to monitor the show, and for mixing (A)

- Spectral analyzer & sound pressure meter (B)

- Far-field monitors, plus speaker clusters (A)

- Sampling/Editing equipment (Analog & Digital) (A or B)

- Personalized Microphone collection, plus personal mic pre-amps (B)

- D.I. Boxes, cables, plugs, connectors, tools, etc.

- Tubes, transistors, fuses, resistors, etc.

- Keyboard Rig, boasting analog & digital units (A or B)

- Professional 2 track, analog or digital, mastering clock (A)

- Professional Multi-track, analog/digital deck (24, 48, etc.) (A)

- Power Amps, Guitar & Bass amps, studio equipment & cue-send amps (A)

- Weighted-action digital piano (A)

- Hammond M-100, C3 or B3 Leslie (Analog) organs (A)

- Multi-plug, step-up transformer (110-240v, 50-60 cycles) (A)

- Gasoline powered A.C. generator (A)

 

 

 

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